Tag Archives: mental health

Get our free e-book, The Truth About Trauma

Over the past two years or so, my colleague and friend Shelly and I have  been asked to speak for child  ptsd girladvocacy  organizations, to medical and mental health professionals, to those who work with trafficked women and children, to abused women and leaders in churches and faith settings, to women and juveniles in prisons, and to families in their homes about the complex and often misunderstood
issues of abuse and trauma.

While Shelly and I are not mental health or medical professionals, we understand the issue of trauma from the inside-out,
and we are able to provide personal narrative and information that unlocks understanding and dialogue on the issue of trauma.

As part of our passion to bring greater understanding to the issue of trauma, we have written an eBook that provides an overview of the basic issues related to trauma and PTSD.

We’re delighted to offer it free.

If you know a friend, loved one, or organization that could benefit from greater understanding on the issue of post-traumatic stress disorder and how to offer hope and healing to those who struggle, please point them in our direction. We’d love to help.

Simply go to the bottom of our home page on PTSDPerspectives.org and click on The Truth about Trauma and follow the prompts.

Someone You Know Has PTSD–and Might Not Know It

by guest blogger, Shelly Beach


“I just finished treatment for complex PTSD. Nobody      understands trauma, so I rarely talk about it.”

The woman sitting next to me on our flight from Denver to Seattle was an accountant. Confident. Self-assured. Professional. And a recovering addict who’d struggled for years with symptoms PTSD stemming from early childhood medical procedures.

It had taken her years to recognize that childhood medical procedures were at the root of the long list of symptoms that had taken her life hostage.

 

Sadly, most people don’t understand the cause-and-effect between trauma and the symptoms of PTSD and rarely seek treatment for the underlying cause.

 

The reality is that life is a series of traumas that the brain processes as either “Big T” or “little t” events, depending on a number of factors. Any event that is so threatening that it (1) overwhelms our brain, (2) triggers a reactive chemical wash that shuts down one side of the brain and causes us to “freeze” initiates the Instinctual Trauma Response (Big T trauma with potential resulting symptoms).

In the past few years, my colleague Wanda and I have met dozens of men and women suffering from PTSD who never realized before meeting us that trauma was the source of their various symptoms: hoarding, self-abuse, addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorder, hearing voices (one of the easiest symptoms to treat), eating disorders, depression, suicidal fixation, and other symptoms.

Many people who have PTSD don’t know that their symptoms aren’t the problem…

   Trauma and /PTSD are the problems, and they CAN be successfully treated.

 

This week our book Love Letters from the Edge: Meditations for Those Struggling with Brokenness, Trauma, and the Pain of Life was released in bookstores and online. This book addresses the desperation and despair felt by those who suffer from PTSD.

 

It gives a voice to those who often feel unfixable, hopeless, and isolated.

 

But more importantly, it offers hope. As women who have experienced PTSD, Wanda and I understand the desperation and the struggles. This is why it was critically important for us to write a book that honestly expressed the feelings of those dealing with PTSD, but also offered compassion, hope, and truth. This book also offers practical resources for family members and friends, as well as support communities, such as churches.

 

Someone you know has PTSD and may not even know it.

 

Learn what it feels like to walk in their shoes. Learn what you can do to help. And if you’re struggling, take the first step toward healing by telling a trusted friend or medical or mental health professional.

Crisis Hotlines

Grateful.

The calenLove Letters from the Edge: Meditations for Those Struggling with Brokenness, Trauma, and the Pain of Lifedar confirms what I suspected when I woke yesterday morning: it was the official publishing date, June 1, 2014, of my first book – or any book for that matter!

Wow. No, really. WOW. WOW! How the heck did THIS happen? What the heck? Exactly WHO the HECK do I think I am?

I actually feel the urge to let myself giggle – just let that almost hysterical giggle that is bubbling up inside of me just SPILL OUT! Loudly. For a long time. I mean, who would have thought that I would be doing THIS? It really is a miracle whether you know it or not.

 

So am I. A miracle. A grateful miracle.

 

Let me cut to the chase, ok?

Not too long ago I was soul-sick and dying. Right there in front of people, I was bleeding out, gasping for an unrestrained breath, and grasping at anything that had the potential to ‘fix’ me. I needed something, anything, that would help me make it through the next moment, day or year without shooting myself or stepping out in front of an 18-wheeler barreling down the highway. 

So grateful that the God of the universe listens to His people when they pray – and that prayer really DOES change things… and PEOPLE!

 

 Love Letters from the Edge: Meditations for Those Struggling with Brokenness,
Trauma, and the Pain of Life

is the name of my book.

It’s co-authored with my friend and mentor, award-winning author Shelly Beach.

It’s not a ‘comfortable’ book because it deals with trauma.
And brokenness. And doubt. And hard questions.

 

But the name of the book speaks of love letters because after women give voice to the pain, lament and trauma of their life – God responds with words of TRUTH and LOVE. He speaks words of a Father who loves His children… most especially the wounded, sick and broken among us. He writes a love letter in response to our pain and questions – and still calls us His very own and continues to love us more than anyone ever will.

If you know someone who is struggling to ‘get it right’, but no matter what she does or how many promises she makes, she just can’t stop doing the things that harm her and cause her to walk in shame, she needs to know that there is HOPE. HOPE for wholeness and healing.

Hope for a good life when trauma, not symptoms, are processed.


Hope. Because there is God.

 

Check it out at www.LoveLettersFromtheEdge.com

 

Broken Places: A View From the Other Side (Part 4 of 5)

And in that first phone conversation she wasn’t ready to tell me.

But whether implicitly or explicitly, one thing Wanda told me in our first conversation was that she was divesting of her possessions and giving them to the people she loved.

She had stopped working in an office with people she’d worked with for a decade – to live and work alone at home. Her family even called her “the hermit.”

She was terrorized by nightmares and flashbacks. Symptoms she’d suffered with for years were escalating.

And coping mechanisms that had helped her control
the pain of PTSD were no longer working.

Wanda believed she was broken beyond repair. But it was easy for me to see that everything about her made sense–that from the time she was a child, she had created a way to cope with the pain of her life. But the coping mechanisms were failing. They ALWAYS do.

The problem was, she’d already tried drug rehab programs, eating disorder clinics, counseling, therapy, and cried out to God for years for healing. She believed she was “unfixable.” And she’d had friends for ten years who had never seen her face and who only knew her through Internet relationships.

I wasn’t sure of anything – except one thing: God. I WAS sure that He is who He says He is… and that He loved Wanda more than any of us ever could. And that He was reaching out to her through… me!

In spite of all the efforts Wanda had made to address her PTSD, I believed Intensive Trauma Therapy in Morgantown, WV could help her. And not only help her, give her back her life. I believed God had put Wanda’s name in my head, picked three songs that told her story, and urged me to call her. Then a week before I called her, he made sure I knew about Allen, a young man who was healed of a lifetime of  struggle with PTSD at Intensive Trauma Therapy in just five days of outpatient treatment.

I figured God had set everything up in the first place,

and He had the details all figured out.

 

During that first visit, Wanda and I went to a public park and completed the intake forms for Intensive Trauma Therapy. It wasn’t easy. It wasn’t pretty.

To be continued…